East End Gage Family


THE EAST END GAGE FAMILY OF HAMILTON ONTARIO

east-end-family

William Gage and James Gage were brothers originally from Londonderry Ireland. They came to North America at an early age, possibly with their parents around 1760-65.  They settled on the Hudson River near Greenbush in New York State.

They married sisters William to Susannah Jones and James to Mary Jones.

During the revolutionary war they fought in the 2nd Ulster County Regiment of the New York Militia.  James was killed defending Fort Clinton and Fort Montgomery on Oct. 6, 1777.

William and his family along with his brother’s wife Mary and her two children, James and Elizabeth, moved from Greenbush to Saltfleet Township in 1790.

Augustus Jones, Susannah and Mary’s brother had arrived in Upper Canada in 1857 as a land surveyor, followed by their brother Philip.  The brothers settled in Stoney Creek.

William and Mary’s son James played a part in the battle of Stoney Creek, which is well documented.

The Gages gained a number of land grants.  William accrued 1600 acres.

They also purchased property, which made them one of the most prosperous and respected families in Stoney Creek and Hamilton.

It was William and Susannah’s son Andrew (1777-1827) who carried the East End Gage family line forward.  His first wife was Deborah Horning.  One of their sons, James (1809-1881) married Eleanor Bates, mentioned below.  After the death of Deborah, Andrew married Mary Huffman.

One of their sons was John Gage (1819-1900).  He married Hanna Cline (1815-1882).  One of their sons was Robert Russell Gage (1840-1918).

Andrew’s son James from above who married Eleanor Bates had a daughter, Hanna Jane Gage.  She married Robert Russell Gage (1840-1918).  He would eventually sell what is now Gage Park to the City of Hamilton in 1917.  Robert and Hanna only had one daughter, Eugenie Gage, who never married.  Therefore the line ended with her death in 1952.

The agreement to purchase the Gage land on Main Street East and Gage Avenue was completed by the City a year before the death of Robert Gage in 1917.

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